PROJECT ALEXANDRIA: A baseline study of the government practice and spending on heritage in the Philippines

ICOMOS Philippines’ past and current interns will present respective research. Dr. Victor Venida from the Ateneo de Manila University will be the discussant for this event.

Project Alexandria 28 September 2020 (Monday) | 6:00 PM Philippine Standard Time

CONTRIBUTORS

“Summary of Conservation Projects in the Philippines: The National Museum and the National Historical Commission of the Philippines”

Ms. Patricia Cecille Monica H. Panganiban is graduated with an Erasmus Mundus Masters in Archaeological Sciences from the University of Evora in Portugal, where she specialized in the study of pigments from Ancient Egpytian funerary masks and sarcophagi. Prior to that, she obtained her Bachelor’s Degree in Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering from the Ateneo de Manila University. She is currently working with the Nayong Pilipino Foundation on the development of the Nayong Pilipino Virtual Museum.

Ms. Ma. Louisen Manuel Roxas is a graduate of BS Human Ecology major in Human Settlements Planning from the University of the Philippines Los Banos, and she is currently pursuing her masters in Urban & Regional Planning at UP Diliman. Currently, she is working as the Training Manager of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT), an internal NGO focused on humanitarian action & community development through open mapping. 

“Diagnostic Report of The Philippine Registry of Cultural Properties (PRECUP)”

Ms. Carissa Veloso is the current ICOMOS Philippines Secretariat. Before joining ICOMOS Philippines, she was the Business Development Manager for San Sebastian Basilica Conservation, a non-profit restoration foundation based in Manila (2015-2019). She was also the representative of the Philippines for UNESCO’s young professionals program for the 42nd World Heritage Committee Session. She holds a BS Management degree with minors in Cultural Heritage and Entrepreneurship from Ateneo de Manila University.

Ms. Chanelle Custorio is both a registered and licensed chemical engineer and architect. She is an alumni of UP Diliman, worked in the restoration of San Sebastian Basilica, and is now a co-partner for the architecture firm Hiraya Design Studio. She has also attended courses on Management and Monitoring of World Heritage Sites by ICCROM as well as on Conservation of Japanese Textiles by TNRICP.

Mr. Isaiah Cabañero is a graduate of Community Development at the University of the Philippines – Diliman, working with communities and volunteer organizations which gained him experience in community organizing and people-centered participatory project development. He is currently working hand-in-hand with local coffee farming ati communities in Iloilo.

Ms. Ruby Descalzo is a recent graduate of the Ateneo de Manila University, with a degree in Environmental Science and a minor in Cultural Heritage Studies. She previously served as the President of Baybayin Ateneo, a Filipino cultural student organization. She is currently under the mentorship of Claudia Montero, and will be working with Dr. John Peterson as part of her internship.

Mr. Gio Abcede is a graduating BS Architecture student from De La Salle University, College of Saint Benilde. He has worked with One/Zero Design Co. on the Maestranza Creative Quarters project and collaborated with Digiscript Philippines Inc. with mapping presentations for the Intramuros Cultural Management Plan. He is also a core member and graphic designer for the Heritage Conservation Society. He is currently working closely with the Architecture Committee of ICOMOS Philippines, under the tutelage of Dominic Galicia.

DISCUSSANT

Dr. Victor Venida, ICOMOS Philippines member, completed his M.Sc. in economics at the London School of Economics and a PhD in economics at New York University. He completed a specialist course in International Economics, Trade and Finance at the Instituto Nacional de Administracion Publica at Alcala de Henares, Spain. Currently e is a Professor with the Department of Economics and a Lecturer with the European Studies Program, Development Studies Program and the Law School of Ateneo de Manila University.

DETAILS

“Project Alexandria ”,  is scheduled this Monday, September 28, 2020, 6:00 PM (Philippine Standard Time).

To register, you may fill up this form:  bit.ly/projalexandriaguest

The talk is for ICOMOS PH members and invited colleagues.

For interested students or new graduates who would like to take internship with the organization visit: bit.ly/icomosphinternship.

Testimonial of Isaiah S. Cabañero from the ICOMOS Internship Program

My internship at ICOMOS Philippines was a unique one, to say the least. Despite the COVID-19 global health crisis and community quarantine measures in the Philippines, the internship experience at the organization, although entirely conducted remotely and facilitated online, has been very educational and worthwhile. Although I worked remotely, was still able to be exposed to different facets of heritage work and the heritage movement in the Philippines and abroad.

One of the first projects I worked on was the continuation of a study on the Philippine Registry of Cultural Property (PRECUP). Primarily, my task was to interview local government units on how they accomplished their annual listings for this registry. Through this we identified gaps in the processes in which ICOMOS, or the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) itself, could intervene at to help resolve the problem for the better.

Fortunate are those LGUs whose government leaders collaborate with local communities for the appreciation, preservation, and conservation of their local cultural properties and heritage. Others submit the list for compliance, so I think more attention from the NCCA and its allied agencies must be channeled towards these localities for continued education and co-creation of local cultural knowledge of their heritage. They could also benefit from direct assistance in both the technical and logistical aspects of the work.

In one of the webinars that ICOMOS hosted on food security, a farming community that was watching got in touch with me. Today I work hand-in-hand with that farming community. After my internship, I am better equipped to understand the unique local context these communities have lived in, both past and present, and appreciate their continuing traditions and survival of community identity in this rapidly urbanizing world. I am happy to witness their shared appreciation of their local culture and, ultimately, the preservation of this local indigenous Filipino heritage.

For interested students or new graduates who would like to take internship with the organization, please contact info@icomosphilippines.com

New Members Speak: Archaeology. In Context. and A Planner’s Vista

New members of ICOMOS PH will be presenting their work to the membership. “Archaeology. In Context.” by Ms. Mylene Lising and “A Planner’s Vista: An Introduction to the Planning Process and Suggestive Measures from Collaborations with LGUs” by LArch. Cris Ugalino. This event is ICOMOS Philippines new lecture series.

New Members Speak: Archaeology. In Context. and A Planner’s Vista 21 September 2020 (Monday) | 6:00 PM Philippine Standard Time

SPEAKERS

Ms. Mylene Lising is an archeologist specializing in the cultural heritage management of prehistoric sites. She received her master’s degree in Quaternary and Prehistory from the Museé National d’Histoire Naturelle, France through the Erasmus Mundus Program (2015) and an MA Archaeology from the UP-ASP (2016). She is currently working on her PhD at the Goethe University, Frankfurt on a grant from the Lisa Maskell Fellowships of the Gerda Henkel Foundation. Her work in heritage management and archaeology focuses on the Cagayan Valley prehistoric sites and materials. Aside from this, she has worked in the media after graduating from Ateneo BS Communications.

LArch. Cris Ugalino is a registered landscape architect, environmental planner, and certified BERDE professional. She received her Landscape Architecture degree from UP Diliman. She was accepted into the UP Diliman School of Urban and Regional Planning, as well as the Department of Science & Technology (Project SPARTA) Data Analyst course. Cris has work experience in project management, landscape bio-engineering, landscape architectural design, consultancy, and research. Her vision in her practice is to share her experiences and enthusiasm in celebrating and preserving Philippine heritage, while giving importance to inclusion between people and places, finding the balance of conservation and people’s initiatives.

REACTORS

Dr. John Peterson is an anthropological archaeologist with field research experience in the Philippines, US Southwest and Texas, Northern Mexico, Ecuador, Brazzaville-Congo, and the Daiyuan Valley of Jiangxi Province China. He specializes in historical ecology and archaeological heritage management. He took his BA from Antioch College in Environmental Studies, MA and PhD from University of Texas at Austin, USA and has had academic affiliations with various universities – University of Texas at El Paso, University of Hawaii, University of Guam, and University of San Carlos in Cebu, and has had academic honors including two Fulbright awards, an NEH fellowship, is a National Geographic Explorer, and managed large grant programs for NSF, NASA, NIH, and other US funding agencies.

Mr. Ivan Man Dy is a cultural tourism professional and the founder of Old Manila Walks – a specialist outfit that operates interpretative tours around the city’s old neighborhood. He received his master’s degree on Cultural Heritage Studies from the University of Santo Tomas. Ivan has been actively involved in the advocacy of heritage conservation with a particular interest in urban, social and architectural histories of Manila. He holds two decades of multi-disciplinary experience in historical research, interpretation, tourism, publishing and creative applications of cultural heritage. He sits as trustee of the Heritage Conservation Society as well as the Museum Foundation of the Philippines.

DETAILS

“New Members Speak: Archaeology. In Context. and A Planner’s Vista ”,  is scheduled this Monday, September 21, 2020, 6:00 PM (Philippine Standard Time).

To register, you may fill up this form: bit.ly/ipnms200921reg.

The talk is for ICOMOS PH members and invited colleagues.

Synthesizing the ICOMOS Webinar – Place-making and Food Security

INTRODUCTION

ICOMOS Philippines members came together online last June 20, 2020 for the webinar, “Place-Making and Food Security: Thinking of Heritage Conservation and Food Production”. This is part of the project, ‘Heritage Practice Amidst Covid 19’. Members and specialists provided some perspectives connecting food security and cultural heritage amidst the challenges of the global pandemic.

CONCEPT

Three key terms were re-examined namely: food security, food sovereignty, and their relationship to cultural heritage:

A. Food security defined as the supply, the availability, and the stability of price of basic foodstuff in the international and domestic market (World Food Conference, 1974). While Food Sovereignty emerged more than three decades later as the reaction to grass roots movements around the world, and uncovered more clearly the mediators, interactions, and instruments of food production, distribution, and consumption.

Food sovereignty prioritises local and national economies and markets and empowers peasant and family farmer-driven agriculture, artisanal – fishing, pastoralist-led grazing, and food production, distribution and consumption based on environmental, social and economic sustainability. Food sovereignty promotes transparent trade that guarantees just incomes to all peoples as well as the rights of consumers to control their food and nutrition.

– Nyéléni Declaration on Food Sovereignty (February 2007) at Sélingué, Mali

B. Cultural heritage acknowledges the central role of change and human culture in shaping food production. The Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras, the Agave Landscape and Ancient Industrial Facilities of Tequila, the Coffee Cultural Landscape of Colombia are just few of the sites representing agricultural practices passed on for generations, later on caters the global market, thus, highlighting the deep connections between food, people, places, and culture in various parts of the world.

Responding to queries – Pursuing a Public Discourse

A healthy public interest in the topic was well-received with questions coming from universities, professional organizations, and national institutions that exposes a need for public discourse in the Philippines on the politics of food.

An example is the Sagada in Northern Philippines which indicates the need for this platform in the public domain, to discuss our changing relationship with nature through food, cultural practices, and tourism.

Photos of a Dap-ay, a traditional place of gathering in Sagada. On the left shows the removal of more modern materials of corrugated metal which was replaced by more traditional roofing materials (right) during the pandemic. Photo from Patricia Santiago.

Responses by the esteemed speakers from the webinar’s questions are shown in the ‘Annex A’ of this report. The questions have been grouped into two broad themes: the first, brings globalization to bear on the Philippine context of food chain; the second focuses on local issues of food, tourism, economic development and intangible heritage.

CONCLUSION

ICOMOS Philippines hopes that this webinar provides new ideas that can contribute to improving the appreciation for Filipino farmers, and artisans, and improve their commercial prospects. The lack of interest and of involvement in traditional agricultural practices especially by the youth, will lead to a loss of traditional knowledge, and risks destruction of cultural landscapes that are shaped by the dying farming traditions. This holds true for fishing villages, sugar plantations, salt-making regions, and other places where food production is central to these cultural landscapes’ cultural significance

In summary the webinar illustrates that humanity’s food resources can be secured, while conserving its most important cultural heritage, based on these three basic principles:

  • Respect for the environment.
  • Build an equitable relationship with the primary producers of our food.
  • Recognise indigenous knowledge systems and practices for the benefit of these communities.

Download the file below to read more.

If you would like to know more about this initiative, please get in touch with Gabriel Caballero, ICOMOS Philippines Communications Officer at communications[at]icomosphilippines[dot]com and Estela Duque, Founder of Moulinet Chocolat Limited at http://www.moulinetchocolat.com/

ICOMOS Webinar Series: Place-making and Food Security

How can the heritage practitioners improve a community’s cultural, economic, social circumstances while preserving the environment? How do you facilitate food production and place making grounded in community-based participation?

Posted by International Council on Monuments and Sites Philippines on Saturday, June 20, 2020
To watch the recorded webinar, see Facebook video.
PHILIPPINES: Farm to Manila

Farmers in the mountain town of Sagada were unable to sell their harvest as usual because of disruptions in transport due to the pandemic. Enter, online support market. For more stories from across Asia:Like and follow Asia Featured on Facebook,or subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/c/AsiaFeatured#Asia #Philippines #farming #covid19

Posted by Asia Featured on Friday, September 18, 2020
“PHILIPPINES: Farm to Manila” – Sustainable Sagada Initiative by Ms. Patricia Maria Santiago

ICOMOS Philippines’ Webinar Series: Rethinking Monuments in the Philippines

This will be a conversation on the current crisis of monumentality and racial reckoning. Broadly put, what is the relationship between monuments and historical commemoration? Who or what do these monuments celebrate and what do they leave out? This event is the third talk in ICOMOS Philippines’ Webinar Series.

ICOMOS Philippines’ Webinar Series: 𝗥𝗲𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗸𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗠𝗼𝗻𝘂𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗣𝗵𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗽𝗽𝗶𝗻𝗲𝘀 14 September 2020 (Monday) | 9:30 AM Philippine Standard Time

SPEAKER

Lila Ramos Shahani is the former Secretary- General of the UNESCO National Commission of the Philippines.

Under her leadership (and with the help of other agencies), her team succeeded in obtaining 4 UNESCO designations for the country: in 2019, an endangered ritual complex (the “buklog” of the Subanen, an indigenous group in the southern part of the Philippines) was inscribed in UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in Need of Urgent Safeguarding.

That same year, Cebu was named a UNESCO Creative City of Design. In 2018, the Culion Leprosy Archives in Palawan were inscribed in the UNESCO Memory of the World Asia-Pacific Register. In 2017, Baguio was named a UNESCO Creative City of Crafts and Folk Art.

She previously gave a talk on the same topic, ‘Rethinking Monuments’ exclusively for the ICOMOS PH members and some questions were raised are: What monuments should be kept and which should retire to the museums? How do we rethink of the relationship between monuments and public spaces which the public are being served by such erections? What do monuments subliminally represent?

REACTOR

Ian Morley is an Associate Professor in the Department of History, and Associate Professor (by Courtesy) on CUHK’s Urban Studies Programme.

He has published widely on the design of built environments and participated in TV documentaries. Just recently, he achieved the status of Senior Fellow from the UK Professional Standards Framework and was a recipient  of the Bosma Prize in Planning History Innovation 2020 from the International Planning History Society (IPHS) for his book American Colonisation and the City Beautiful: Filipinos and Planning in the Philippines, 1916-35.

He currently is an editorial board member of the Brill book series Studies in Architecture and Urban History, as well as of Planning Perspectives.

DETAILS

The webinar, “ICOMOS Philippines’ Webinar Series: 𝗥𝗲𝘁𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗸𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗠𝗼𝗻𝘂𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗣𝗵𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗽𝗽𝗶𝗻𝗲𝘀”,  is scheduled this Monday, September 14, 2020, 9:30 AM (Philippine Standard Time).

Zoom registration is on a first come first served basis. To register, you may fill up this form: bit.ly/ipws200914.

The talk will be streamed on Facebook Live where the speaker will be able to get your questions and respond:  facebook.com/icomosph/live

ICOMOS Philippines: New Members 2020

ICOMOS Philippines is very pleased to welcome its new members for the year 2020! Get to know them as we share with you a brief of their profile and expertise.

Mylene Lising

Ms. Mylene Lising is an archeologist specializing in the cultural heritage management of prehistoric sites. She received her master’s degree in Quaternary and Prehistory from the Museé National d’Histoire Naturelle, France through the Erasmus Mundus Program (2015) and an MA Archaeology from the UP-ASP (2016). She is currently working on her PhD at the Goethe University, Frankfurt on a grant from the Lisa Maskell Fellowships of the Gerda Henkel Foundation. Her work in heritage management and archaeology focuses on the Cagayan Valley prehistoric sites and materials. Aside from this, she has worked in the media after graduating from Ateneo AB Communications.

Cris Justine Ugalino

Ms. Cris Ugalino is a registered landscape architect, environmental planner, and certified BERDE professional. She received her Landscape Architecture degree from UP Diliman. She was accepted into the UP Diliman School of Urban and Regional Planning, as well as the Department of Science & Technology (Project SPARTA) Data Analyst course. Cris has work experience in project management, landscape bio-engineering, landscape architectural design, consultancy, and research. Her vision in her practice is to share her experiences and enthusiasm in celebrating and preserving Philippine heritage, while giving importance to inclusion between people and places, finding the balance of conservation and people’s initiatives.